April is Minority Health Month

April is Minority Health Month

Kaitlin Gallo, Ph.D.
Chief Clinical Officer, CCH

April is Minority Health Month, and Christie Campus Health would like to take the opportunity to highlight a sampling of some of the recent coverage of minority mental health topics by our nonprofit affiliate, the Mary Christie Institute, in the Mary Christie Quarterly. The Mary Christie Quarterly is a publication that provides thought leaders with news, information, and commentary on the issues facing administrators and policymakers regarding student health and higher education policy.      

  • An interview with Dr. Annelle Primm, Senior Medical Director of the Steve Fund, about some experiences of college students of color and how colleges can support them during these turbulent times.
  • A piece on the mental health of black student athletes including interviews with student athletes and data such as this finding from Dr. Alisia (Giac-Thao) T. Tran at Arizona State University that 78% of racial and ethnic minority students reported a mental health need but only 11% accessed services.
  • A Quadcast interview with President Lee Pelton of Emerson College touching on many topics including a heartfelt and impactful public letter he wrote following the murder of George Floyd.
  • An interview with President Marion Ross Fedrick of Albany State University, an Historically Black University in Georgia, in which she discussed stigma around mental health topics and how mental health has become a presidential priority.
  • A Q&A with Dr. Rachel Levine, who was at the time of the interview the Pennsylvania Secretary of Health and is now the U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health and the first openly transgender official to hold a federal office that requires Senate confirmation. Dr. Levine spoke about a number of topics including the pandemic’s disparities for people of color and people in the LGBTQ community. 
  • A feature on Dr. Nadia Ward, Director of the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at Clark University, whose focus is improving the emotional and behavioral health of adolescents and young adults, particularly young men of color. 
  • An interview with Dr. Pam Eddinger, President of Bunker Hill Community College, the largest community college in Massachusetts, who talked about her experience as an immigrant and an Asian woman who was the first in her family to attend college, about the school’s Center for Equity and Cultural Wealth, and how four-year colleges can support students of color or first generation college students who transfer in from a community college.

Christie Campus Health is proud to be the lead sponsor of the Mary Christie Institute, a national thought leadership organization dedicated to improving the emotional and behavioral health of teens and young adults with a particular focus on American college students. Through convening, research, journalism and advocacy, The Mary Christie Institute has become the inter-institutional epicenter for new ideas and initiatives in college-age behavioral health.

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